expel


expel
01. The principal has [expelled] three students for beating up another boy.
02. He has been suspended from school a number of times and is at risk of being [expelled].
03. A full-grown oak tree [expels] about seven tons of water through its leaves each day.
04. Growing plants use ground water, which is then [expelled] back into the atmosphere.
05. In August 1990, Iraq seized Kuwait, but was [expelled] by American-led United Nations coalition forces during the Gulf War.
06. Clams eat by taking in water through an organ called the siphon, and filtering out their food before [expelling] the excess water.
07. Small hairs in your nose work to trap dust particles and then [expel] them by making you sneeze.
08. In 1915, David Ben-Gurion, future Prime Minister of Israel, was [expelled] from Palestine for his nationalist and socialist activities.
09. Author Edgar Allan Poe was [expelled] from West Point Military Academy for showing up for a public parade wearing only a white belt and gloves.
10. Under the new immigration policy, refugees with no credible claim could be immediately [expelled].
11. In 1942, the Canadian government ordered the [expulsion] of all Canadians of Japanese ethnic origin from the West Coast.
12. In February, 1956, the first African-American woman to integrate the University of Alabama was [expelled] after three days, due to the riots that had broken out. Thirty-two years later, that expulsion was revoked, and she was invited to re-enroll.
13. Musician Eric Clapton was [expelled] from the Kingston College of Art, where he was studying stained-glass design because he kept playing his guitar in class.
14. In February, 1956, the first African-American woman to integrate the University of Alabama was expelled after three days, due to the riots that had broken out. Thirty-two years later, that [expulsion] was revoked, and she was invited to re-enroll.
15. In 1994, figure skater Tonya Harding was [expelled] from the U.S. Figure Skating Association for having her bodyguard attack and injure her main rival, Nancy Kerrigan.
16. Franz Kafka wrote that the [expulsion] from Paradise was in one sense a piece of good fortune, for if we had not been expelled, Paradise would have had to be destroyed.
17. Franz Kafka wrote that the expulsion from Paradise was in one sense a piece of good fortune, for if we had not been [expelled], Paradise would have had to be destroyed.
18. Ronald Reagan once stated that God should never have been [expelled] from America's classrooms.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • expel — ex‧pel [ɪkˈspel] verb expelled PTandPPX expelling PRESPARTX [transitive] to officially make someone leave a country or an organization: • In the past, the government found it legally difficult to identify and expel illegal immigrants. expel… …   Financial and business terms

  • Expel — Ex*pel , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Expelled}, p. pr. & vb. n.. {Expelling}.] [L. expellere, expulsum; ex out + pellere to drive: cf.F. expeller. See {Pulse} a beat.] 1. To drive or force out from that within which anything is contained, inclosed, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • expel — I verb banish, cut out, deport, discard, discharge, dislodge, dismiss, disown, dispose of, dispossess, drive out, eicere, eject, eliminate, emit, evict, exclude, excommunicate, exigere, exile, expatriate, expellere, extrude, force away, force out …   Law dictionary

  • expel — [v1] discharge belch, blow out, cast out, disgorge, dislodge, drive out, ejaculate, eruct, erupt, evacuate, exhaust, exudate, exude, get rid of, irrupt, pass, remove, spew, throw out, vomit; concept 179 Ant. absorb, admit, take in expel [v2]… …   New thesaurus

  • expel — late 14c., from L. expellere drive out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + pellere to drive (see PULSE (Cf. pulse) (1)). Meaning to eject from a school is first recorded 1640s. Related: Expelled; expelling …   Etymology dictionary

  • expel — *eject, oust, dismiss, evict Analogous words: *banish, exile, ostracize: *dismiss, discharge, cashier, fire: *discard, cast: *exclude, shut out, eliminate Antonyms: admit (sense 1) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • expel — ► VERB (expelled, expelling) 1) force or drive out. 2) force (a pupil) to leave a school. DERIVATIVES expellable adjective expellee noun expeller noun. ORIGIN Latin expell …   English terms dictionary

  • expel — [ek spel′, ikspel′] vt. expelled, expelling [ME expellen < L expellere < ex , out + pellere, to thrust: see PULSE1] 1. to drive out by force; force out; eject 2. to dismiss or send away by authority; deprive of rights, membership, etc. SYN …   English World dictionary

  • expel — UK [ɪkˈspel] / US verb [transitive] Word forms expel : present tense I/you/we/they expel he/she/it expels present participle expelling past tense expelled past participle expelled 1) to officially force someone to leave a place or organization… …   English dictionary

  • expel — ex|pel [ ık spel ] verb transitive 1. ) to officially force someone to leave a place or organization because of their bad behavior: They have no legal power to expel a party member. expel someone from something: The police were sent to expel the… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • expel — v. (D; tr.) to expel from (to expel a child from school) * * * [ɪk spel] (D; tr.) to expel from (to expel a child from school) …   Combinatory dictionary